Events


I gave a talk last night at Social Media Cafe about OpenStreetMap. I actually haven’t been too involved in the OSM community of late so it was nice to get back into it a little bit. It was also good to find that a large portion of the audience was not already aware of OSM so it was nice to introduce it to people.

You can find the video of Social Media Cafe on USTREAM. The video will be chopped up soon at which point I’ll link to or embed my own talk here too.

I ended up with 63 slides taking up about 100MB so I’m going to try not uploading it to Slideshare this time, instead I’m going to summarise the talk here.

OpenStreetMap - John McKerrell @mcknut - Freelance Software Developer

Why do we need OpenStreetMap?

  • Geodata historically isn’t
    • Current – things change so often maps quickly become outdated.
    • Open – if you know the map is wrong, wouldn’t it be simpler to let you update it yourself?
    • Free – You want me to pay how much for Ordnance Survey data?? Especially an issue when you’ve helped build the map.
  • Wiki is obvious next step
  • It’s just fun

We make beautiful maps…

…which we give away

It’s not just Liverpool, or even the UK, in the talk I showed maps of the Hague, Washington, DC and Berlin. You can pan and zoom the map above to browse the coverage.

Some Quotes

“It’s absolutely possible for a bunch of smart guys with the technology we have today to capture street networks, and potentially the major roads of the UK and minor roads”
Ed Parsons, ex-CTO Ordnance Survey
currently Geospatial Technologist for Google

“If you don’t make [lower-resolution mapping data] publicly available, there will be people with their cars and GPS devices, driving around with their laptops .. They will be cataloguing every lane, and enjoying it, driving 4×4s behind your farm at the dead of night. There will, if necessary, be a grass-roots remapping.”
Tim Berners-Lee

“You could have a community capability where you took the GPS data of people driving around and started to see, oh, there’s a new road that we don’t have, a new route .. And so that data eventually should just come from the community with the right software infrastructure.”
Bill Gates

Some big names in technology who clearly think user-generated mapping data is a good idea.

Isn’t Google Free?

A lot of people ask the question “Why do we need OpenStreetMap when Google Maps is free?”

Current?

Google Map of Liverpool showing places that are no longer pertinent

http://maps.google.co.uk/?ll=53.40407,-2.985835&spn=0.010937,0.031693&t=m&z=16

This picture shows a Google Map screenshot that I took on 16th February 2012. In the centre of the map you can see the Moat House Hotel. This was bulldozed in 2005 but still shows up on Google’s map. You’ll also see the Consulate of the United States in Liverpool. This was also closed down some time ago. So you can see that Google Maps isn’t perfectly current (and, for the record, I have now reported these problems to Google).

Open?

Google have launched their own project to map the planet. Map Maker allows people in many countries to edit the data of the map, adding roads and POIs in a similar way to OSM. Unfortunately Google doesn’t then provide full access to this data back to the people who have made it! Map tiles are generated and shapes of the data entered can be retrieved but the full detail of the data is kept by Google. The license offered by Google also restricts its use to non-commercial usage, stopping people who have put effort into creating the data from being able to derive an income from it.

Free?

Though Google’s mapping API is free to use initially they have recently introduced usage limits. Though they claim that this will only affect 0.35% of their customers, it has already affected a number of popular websites that simply can’t afford to pay what Google is requesting. Some examples will be given of these later.

Google Support OSM

It would be unfair to talk about the bad parts of Google without mentioning the good. Google has regularly supported OSM through donations, sponsorship of mapping parties and support through their “Summer of Code” programme.

As do other providers

It also wouldn’t be fair to paint Google as the only supporter, for example:

  • Mapquest sponsors and supports OSM efforts.
  • Microsoft Bing Maps sponsors and supports OSM efforts, even allowing their aerial imagery to be traced.

Workshops

Or, Map as Party (Mapping Parties!)

The first mapping party was in the Isle of Wight. At the time the only “free” map data available was an Ordnance Survey map that had gone out of copyright:

Isle of Wight OS Map

A group of people went to the island for a weekend and collected GPS traces of all the roads:

And from these made a great looking map:

We also held a mapping party in Liverpool in November 2007 which allowed us to essentially complete the map of the centre of Liverpool.

That video shows the traces of everyone involved with the mapping party as they went around Liverpool and mapped the streets. It was built using the scripts referenced on this wiki page

Editing OSM

Visit openstreetmap.org and sign up for an account. If you have GPS traces, upload them, don’t worry if you don’t as you’ll be able to help by editing existing data or tracing over aerial imagery.

Data Model

  • Nodes
    • Single point on the earth – Latitude and Longitude
  • Way
    • Ordered list of nodes which together make up a long line or an enclosed area
  • Relation
    • A method of relating multiple ways and nodes together, e.g. “turning from way A to way B using node C is not allowed”
  • Tags
    • Nodes/Ways/Relations can have key=value pairs attached to describe their properties.
    • Example node tags:
      • amenity=place_of_worship, religion=buddhist
      • amenity=post_box
    • Example way tags:
      • highway=primary
      • oneway=yes

An online flash editor is available (Potlatch) simply by clicking the “Edit” link when looking at any map on OSM. An offline editing desktop app built in Java is also available, JOSM

There are hundreds of tags that you can use to describe almost any data, use the wiki to find more information especially the Map Features page.

License

CC-BY-SA

This license lets anyone use the OSM maps for free so long as you mention that the source was OpenStreetMap and you share what you produce under a similar license.

Very soon the license will change from CC-BY-SA to Open Database License which offers similar freedoms with more suitable legal terminology. Do read into it if you think it will affect you.

OSM in Action

Nestoria, a popular property website, has long supported OSM. A few years ago they made use of OSM data by using the maps generated from the Isle of Wight mapping party to replace the non-existent data in Google Maps. More recently they have been affected by Google’s plans to charge for its map data and so they have switched fully to OpenStreetMap data and maps.

CycleStreets is a great website for finding cycle routes. They offer a directions engine that gives detailed descriptions of routes, allowing you to pick between Balanced, Fastest and Shortest routes. They also offer lots more information and a database of photos to give more insight into a journey. The routes they recommend are ideal for keeping cyclists off the busy dangerous roads and onto the quieter safer more direct routes.

mapme.at is a website that I have built for tracking people’s location. People use it to track places that they visit and journeys that they take. I use it to track everywhere I ever go. Adrian McEwen wrote a script that puts the location of the Mersey Ferries into mapme.at and that’s what you can see in the map above.

A few years ago I worked with ITO World to create some animations of my data. They created great animations which you can find on my vimeo account but below is one showing every journey I took in January 2010 with each day being played concurrently.

All travels in January 2010 run at once. from John McKerrell on Vimeo.

Geocaching is a popular pastime based around GPSes, treasure hunting and maps. Their website used Google Maps and they also had issues when Google started to charge. As a result they have switched to OpenStreetMap too.

Mobile

Lots of mobile apps are available to let you use and contribute to OpenStreetMap

Android

Not being a regular user of Android I can’t recommend any apps personally but there is a large list of OSM Android apps on the wiki and I’ve selected the following based on features they claim to offer.

gopens and MapDroyd both allow you to browse OpenStreetMap maps on the go and claim to offer offline support, allowing you to view maps even when you’re not connected to the internet.

Skobbler Navigation provides a full Tom-Tom style satnav for navigating on the go, all based on OpenStreetMap data.

Mapzen POI Collector is a handy way to collect POI data while out and about, or to edit existing data.

iPhone

Skobbler Navigation is also available for iPhone, again providing a full Tom-Tom style satnav for navigating on the go, all based on OpenStreetMap data.

NavFree is another full satnav app based on OpenStreetMap data.

Offmaps is an OSM map viewer that allows you to download large chunks of map tiles in advance so that you have them, for instance, when you go on holiday. I would recommend the original Offmaps over Offmaps2 as I believe the latter restricts the data you can access.

Mapzen POI Collector again is available for iPhone and is a handy way to collect POI data while out and about, or to edit existing data.

Humanitarian

OpenStreetMap has been heavily involved in Humanitarian efforts, these have resulted in the formation of HOT – the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team. Projects have included mapping the Gaza Strip and Map Kibera a project to map the Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya. These projects have many benefits to the communities involved. Simply having map data helps the visibilities of important landmarks: water stations, Internet cafes, etc. Teaching the locals how to create the maps teaches valuable technical skills. Some people build on the data to provide commercial services to their neighbours, building businesses to support themselves and their families.

A hugely influential demonstration of the impact of OpenStreetMap involvement in humanitarian efforts occurred after the massive earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010. Very shortly after the earthquake hit, the OSM community realised that the lack of geodata in what was essentially a third world country, would cause massive problems with aid workers going in to help after the earthquake. The community responded by tracing the aerial imagery that was already available to start to improve the data and later efforts included getting newer imagery, getting Haitian ex-pats to help with naming features and working with the aid agencies to add their data to the map. You can see some of the effects of these efforts from the video below that shows the edits that occurred in Haiti around the time of the earthquake.

OpenStreetMap – Project Haiti from ItoWorld on Vimeo.

Switch2OSM

If all of this has piqued your interest then visit openstreetmap.org to take a look at the map, sign up and get involved in editing. Find more information on the wiki at wiki.openstreetmap.org or find out how you can switch your website to OpenStreetMap at Switch2OSM.org

Spent much of this week finishing off the next stage of development for the Chess Viewer. One of the key things we wanted to get into this version was the ability to buy books from Everyman Chess’s website. If you look at their iPhone app page you’ll see that they have a selection of books available in the right format for the iOS app. Each of these is sold for $19.99. At the moment it would be quite a faff to buy the book in Safari on your phone and then download it and get it into the app, the new functionality aims to make this much easier by letting you browse the books on the phone and purchase them with your iTunes details. I was a little nervous about how difficult this could be having read some horror stories, but it did all seem relatively straight-forward so I had only allowed 2-3 days for it. In the end it did take just about 3 days and wasn’t so bad, I think I was well prepared having read some great web pages about it so that when I did have problems I knew how to handle them. This page had some great information and a class to use to work with the app store. This in-app purchases walkthrough was also invaluable. The first of those links seemed to be aiming for a different sort of thing than I was so I actually used the second more but reading both was good to know what to expect. The second one was good for taking you through the steps you’d need to do, including setting up the items to be purchased in iTunes Connect, and also telling you what you’d need to do before testing. A second page by the same guy gives a good breakdown for how to handle “Invalid Product ID” messages from the app store. I did get to a point where I was repeatedly getting no valid product IDs from Apple’s servers and so was seeing no products in my store, in this case (following the instructions on that page) I needed to delete the app and reinstall it to get things going again.

I got all of this working and managed to finish the other features and fix a few remaining bugs. I’m really happy with how things are looking, the app has gone from being a fairly basic looking iPhone app (with lots going on under the hood) to a much better presented app (with even more going on under the hood!) Hopefully we won’t find too many bugs while testing over the next few weeks and can get the new version on the store soon.

A few more libraries that really helped me were ASIHTTPRequest – a great iOS class for handling web requests which made it really easy for me to submit files back to the server if people have problems with them, I’m sure I’ll be using this one again. Also ZIStoreButton – a class that mimics the buy button on the app store, it shows up as a blue button with a price in and when tapped changes to green and says “Buy Now”. I’ve linked to my own github fork there as I did make a few changes to make it more compatible with pre-iOS4 devices and to (IMHO) better match the style of the app store button.

Apart from this I attended the 4th Maker Night of the year. That was good fun, we had a great turn-out and had people working on all sorts of different things. I found I wandered between projects catching up with people and helping out but did get time to help complete a few pieces for the Cupcake 3D printer we’ve been building. Also this week, on a similar vein, I’ve been writing up my experiences with my new “home management” system – YAHMS. There’ll be more to come from that when I get time.

I’ve had a busy week this week attending the various Social Media in Liverpool Week events that I wrote about last week. I just wanted to post an update to talk about the Social Media Cafe Liverpool iPhone app that I released last night.

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to declare the app live last night but the review went through and I can finally do it, head here to download the app and get lots of information about the great talks we’ve had at Social Media Cafe over the last year. You can find the slides for my Life Cycle of an iPhone App talk here.

As I mentioned in my talk, I have made the app available as Open Source Software under the Artistic License 2.0. What this means is that anyone can go away and create apps based on my code. The main requirement is that if you do so then you can’t modify the source code to hide the fact that I was the original creator, but read the license for confirmation on the details.

The source code is actually available in two parts. The Social Media Cafe app is quite simple and small and provides an app that will download a feed of information and then pass it on to a “Hierarchy View Controller”. This is part of the “HierarchyApp” which is a separate code base which I developed last year. I’ve also released this as open source under the same license so with both of these available anyone should be able to develop some interesting apps with a minimum of effort. Click the following links for more information:

Social Media Cafe iPhone app on GitHub

HierarchyApp on GitHub

While the data within the app can be updated by modifying a simple text file on a server there’s still plenty of features that the app could do with, which will require modifying the source code. It might be nice to have a page of information about the next event, or perhaps a page showing recent twitter traffic. If you have any ideas for features, or you come across bugs, then add them to the smcliv Issues page on GitHub and hopefully I, or anyone else who feels like delving into the code, will add them.

If you do use the code then I’d love to hear about it and see what you’ve done, and if you want me to help you develop an app I’d still be happy to get involved.

I’ll be posting an update of what I’ve been up to recently soon but I also wanted to write something about what’s happening in the coming week. We’re celebrating “Social Media in Liverpool Week” (we got told off for calling it Social Media Week™©®) and also Global Ignite Week with a week of activities in Liverpool. Getting into the spirit of things I’ve agreed to speak at two of them.

The first event of the week is Ignite Liverpool tomorrow in the LJMU Art & Design Academy. I was quite disappointed not to be able to speak last year (though I must admit I did enjoy my time on a yacht in the Whitsundays ;-)) so I jumped at the chance to speak this year. I’m going to be giving a talk on “Open Source Software Projects I Have Known”. I’m intending it to be a fairly lighthearted overview of various applications and projects that people should really be aware of and using. There’s lots of other talks lined up so if you’re in the area you should definitely come along. There’s not many tickets left so be quick!

On Wednesday there will be a meeting of the Society of Swandeliers, or the Friends of Swan Pedalo. In Autumn John O’Shea of Re-Dock procured a Swan pedalo that was being sold off cheap by Liverpool Biennial organisation. This meeting is of people who have shown interest in working with the pedalo to try to determine what to do with it. We’ve all got lots of ideas but a 6ft fibreglass swan isn’t so easy to move around so it can be quite difficult to arrange activities for it. I’ll be going along and hopefully we’ll all be able to work something out.

Thursday is time for another Social Media Cafe Liverpool event, also in the Art & Design Academy. I’ll be giving a talk on the lifecycle of an iPhone app. I’m intending to give an idea of the various stages you go through when building an app and getting it live on the app store. I’ll also have a few surprises during my talk too. There’s also going to be a live skype interview and more besides so head over to the website to sign up for that.

Finally on Friday there’s going to be the Social Media Social or “Oh, I follow you on Twitter”. More details on that can be found on the Social Media Cafe Liverpool website but essentially it’s a free party in the Leaf bar on Bold St. Entertainment will be provided (but you’ll need to buy your own drinks!) I’m going to a friend’s birthday party first but should be there later on in the evening.

So a busy week ahead, should be fun!

So these weeknotes are rapidly, or rather slowly, becoming “monthnotes”. The past few weeks have seen a few interesting things happen though so I thought I’d get another post up. Last week saw the completion of version 1.0 of the Examstutor iPhone apps. We managed to get the content for all of the 9 subjects we were hoping to support finished and so submitted 18 apps! We’re now just waiting to see what Apple will say, hopefully they’ll go straight through without any rejections but you can never be too sure. We’re submitting two apps per subject. One is quite simply a paid-for app, you pay your money and you get access to hundreds of questions on your subject. The other will be a free app in the store but is intended to be used by schools and colleges (and, in fact, individuals) who have signed up with examstutor.com for use of their online and mobile service. On downloading the free app they will be prompted for a username and password, when they enter this they will get full access to all the content “free”. We’ve included a few tests (generally around 20 questions) for people to use on the free app though so that if they download it by accident they still get to try it out and can then decide to upgrade if they want.

Last week I also managed to get the final few issues sorted out with my chess app, it’s looking better and hopefully I’ll be able to submit to the store pretty soon.

I also got most of the work done adding features to the Ruby on Rails site I mentioned in my last blog post. I needed to generate PDF invoices for a selection of addresses and services in the database and managed to get the work done pretty quickly. This was the whole point of converting from the awful PHP to a new codebase but I was still surprised by how quickly I got it done. I mainly need to make some changes to the PDF document to better match what the client wants and then let them try the system out and see what they think. I’ve used Prawn for the PDF generation and have been quite happy with it finding it pretty easy to use.

Final thing to mention is my location clock that has been quite popular on this blog previously. I originally built it at Howduino Liverpool in May 2009 – around 18 months ago. It has sat around with barely any updates since then and so was still made up of a big messy bundle of wires.

With the second Liverpool Howduino event coming up I decided I really had to get around to soldering this up, and I wanted to get it done before the event so that I could play with something else on the day (Xbee modules, lasers and a second four handed clock powered by servos were all on my list). Leaving it to the last minute I finally got started on building a circuit board on Thursday and did manage to get it finished off on Friday. Unfortunately I had a few issues with it, various connections connected that shouldn’t have been, and others that should have been were not. I then found that for some reason the software that had been working fine before had stopped working too. Fortunately I finally managed to get it all working on Saturday so now have a fully working circuit board and software.

So why am I not happy now? When I came into the office this morning I picked up the clock and started looking to see if I could get a chime to fit in the casing and where would be best to fit the arduino and cut holes for the ethernet, USB and power ports. I brushed past the motor and it wobbled, I thought “hmm, that seemed loose…. OMG, THAT’S LOOSE!!” After something like a year of being firmly stuck on by Araldite the stepper motor has now detached itself from the mechanism so my clock is still not working. I’m going to go out at lunchtime and see what glue I can find that might be able to stick a metal motor onto a brass mechanism, or possibly try to think of an alternative!

Ignite 3 featured in the Liverpool Daily Post

Not quite so stressful a week this week though it did have its moments. I spent Monday morning catching up on some much delayed tasks. Nothing particularly interesting just bits and pieces like polishing off the print styles for case studies on the Marketing PRojects website and adding a blog feed to the homepage.

A new bug was reported on the music iPhone app though which caused some consternation. The app allows you to log into a site and download the information about music that you’ve previously bought. It seemed though that for some users it would display nothing even though the information was being downloaded. It didn’t take me too long to track it down to something relating to an SQLite database I was using. I would parse the reponse from the server and then add all the information to the database. I would then close the database in one function and then reopen it in another function and read it back in. For some reason though when I tried to read the information back in it was finding no rows in the database. The bug seemed only to occur on iPhone OS 3 and only for certain users. In the end I couldn’t track down the actual cause and had to just save the information to the database but then ignore the database and just use the information from memory. It’s obviously a more efficient way of doing things, there’s not really much point reading the information back from the database when you already have it in memory. I guess I was doing it that way to make sure that I always read the current data from the database to make sure it was always in the same format. Now the database is only used when you first load the app and everything works nicely. Annoyingly though I wasted a day trying to sort that out.

I also worked on adding some features to a property management database that I wrote last year for The Restaurant Group. This is a site built using the Zend Framework to give a fairly lightweight API onto a database and then a rich JavaScript interface built with JQuery and the Multimap API. Most of the features were fairly simple and were sorted within a day. The most troublesome one though was to add the ability to log into the system by entering a username and password from a Microsoft Active Directory system. I managed to get the authentication step working without too much difficulty using the Zend LDAP Authentication class but I also needed to check the groups that the user was in to determine whether they were allowed to make changes to the system or were only allowed to view the information. After a few hours of getting nowhere we eventually decided to try using an alternative library. adLDAP is an LDAP wrapping library specifically tailored to accessing Active Directory systems. I used this and again managed to get the authentication working easily but the groups still caused some issues. In the end we found that the AD system I was testing against was set up in a non-standard way. After a few tests against the real live system we found that the library was working fine and I eventually managed to get it all working.

I also managed to spend a little time on the chess app, didn’t make too much progress but I’ve managed to get the full moves view to slide in from the side and slide out again when you’ve selected a new move to go to (or clicked the “X” in the corner).

The final thing that caused issues this week was the mapme.at server. On Thursday morning I decided to upgrade the kernel as ubuntu was telling me there was a new one available with some security fixes. The upgrade went fine and I carefully made sure that all the services were running and that nothing had been broken by the upgrade. A few hours later I just happened to go to the site only to find I was getting errors. I logged in to try to track down what was happening, at first this was difficult because oddly I was getting no errors in the log file. It was only when I realised that the filesystem had mounted itself as read only that I realised something fairly major was wrong. This has happened once before and at the time I just rebooted the system and it came back fine, I rebooted now though and it didn’t come back. I was hoping it was doing a disk check so I left it for a few minutes before eventually requesting console access from my hosting provider hetzner.de. When that came through I found the system was complaining that it couldn’t find the superblock, or the disk or something along those lines which was when I realised something was quite wrong. I put in a support request for them to take a look and waited for them to get back to me. After an hour or so of no response I sent them another email, two and a half hours after the original request I was told it was just a filesystem error and that they had booted into the rescue system to run a disk check. After over 12 hours of waiting for more information I emailed them again to be told that the disk check was waiting for input and that I should just run it myself, so it had essentially been doing nothing for all that time! I logged into the rescue system and ran the check myself. It took nearly two hours but finally after that I got the machine back up and running. I realise now that I should really have been able to handle most of the “repair” myself but I’m still very disappointed with Hetzner’s feedback. Taking hours to give any response and then failing to anticipate that the disk check would need user input (“fsck -y” would have fixed this) are pretty crap. At least now I’m more prepared if anything similar happens in the future. Not only am I more confident about how to fix the problem (though I’m still not 100% sure how to get into the “rescue system”) but I’ve now also invested in the services of Pingdom. When mapme.at went down it actually took me a few hours to notice but now that I have Pingdom set up it should alert me ASAP if there’s any further problems.

To end on a positive note, I went to the third Ignite Liverpool on Thursday night. We had another really fun night with talk subjects ranging from cows to cannibilism, and had Batman talking about using the “Systems Failures Approach” to analyse why his arch enemies were so unsuccessful (see photo above). Social events in Liverpool are just getting better and better these days. At the end of this month we’ve got the second Social Media Cafe Liverpool and Jelly Liverpool to look forward to (both on the open labs calendar). There’s also How? Why? DIY! which is not, as it may sound, going to consist of a Sunday afternoon putting up shelves but will offer a day of interesting sessions aimed at helping people use the full potential of the technology, community and social media facilities available to them. Take a look at the link for that one as there’s some interesting sessions planned and I’ll be going along to try to get people interested in mapping too!

Just a short week this week so a short blog post too I think. Fixed plenty of bugs in the two client iPhone apps I’m doing at the moment and got new versions over to the clients for testing. One of the apps seems to be running a bit slow but I think this is just an issue with how I’m keeping the UI up to date which should be quite fixable. They seem happy with the UI now which means that they’re happy with the functionality so hopefully it’s just some final bug fixing and polish left to do. I haven’t heard anything back about the other app so I’m hoping they’re happy with that one now too.

I finished off the week by attending the Hacks & Hackers event organised by ScraperWiki and OpenLabs Liverpool. The idea of the event was to bring together Journalists (hacks) and software developers/hardware hackers/general web people (hackers) and see what they could come up with by working together. We began the event by introducing ourselves and those with a specific interest in a topic declared this interest. We then had 10 minutes to meet each other and form groups around the various topics and then had 6-7 hours to get building something.

I ended up in a group who wanted to look at the social legacy left by the World Cup in Africa. Not something that specifically relates to me but I thought it might be interesting to see what we could produce. After an hour or so of looking for data sources we ended up realising that there really wasn’t much out there. We had tried looking for data on the social implications of the World Cup, looking at how previous similar events had affected developing countries and tried comparing aspects of this World Cup to England’s bid for the 2018 tournament. In the end we decided to bring together 11 facts about the South Africa tournament and 11 facts about England’s bid and display them like player lineups.

Trying to find 22 statistics proved fairly difficult, unfortunately we couldn’t find a single source to use for all of them so there was no opportunity for me to automate the process, which also meant I didn’t get to try out ScraperWiki. It did have one benefit though as the journalists could all spend the afternoon researching while I and the other developer, Francis Fish, could be working on the presentation mechanism.

We decided the best way to get the player lineups to display would be to use a HTML page styled up to look correct and then use CSS & JavaScript to present the statistics when the shirts were clicked on. Some of the CSS got quite tricky, and is still not perfect, but the JS wasn’t too bad just using jQuery to animate between properties. I thought having the numbers appear on their own on the shirts and then having any extra descriptive prefix and postfix fade in would look pretty good. A small description of each stat also appears below. I also tried out a jQuery plugin that allows fading between colours including alpha channels. This gives some nice effects allowing you to fade a colour background in by increasing its opacity without having to change the opacity of elements within the element. In the end though I found I didn’t need this but I may use it in the future.

If you’re interested in seeing what we created here’s a link to it, The other World Cup. (Now updated with the correct link)

So a very busy week as I had various projects to try to finish off and plenty to do to prepare for my State of the Map talk. Also kittens!

Happy Family

It might seem a bit odd to mention kittens on a blog post about my work week. It’s actually quite sensible though, these fluffy critters took up a sizable amount of time in my week!

But apart from that. Most of my time last week was spent trying to tie up loose ends and get the iPhone apps I’ve been doing ready for testing. I discussed the changes in functionality needed for one of the apps and the client has agreed to pay for some more of my time to get those bits added, so that’s great. I spent some time getting the most important changes done but will do most of that extra work this week and will hopefully get that app finished soon.

The smaller app that I was waiting for sign-off on I finished on Monday and sent that off to Testing first thing Tuesday. I was quite happy with it and felt it was working well. I heard from the client on Friday but haven’t yet had time to look at how many bugs they’ve found, hopefully not too many!

I began some work on new functionality for mapme.at to allow users to consolidate their favourites. Part of this work is to allow user’s to take their old favourites and merge them with places that mapme.at has found in the OSM database. The other part is to allow users to manually match OSM places on to Foursquare venues that perhaps have slightly different names or for other reasons the automated matching hasn’t been able to manage. I was hoping to have this ready by the time of State of the Map so I could announce this great effort to come up with a repository of ID mappings but unfortunately with kittens and finishing client work I didn’t manage it. In fact I didn’t even manage to finish my presentation until I was on the train to Girona and finally had an hour to sit in front of my laptop with no distractions and no interruptions. My talk on Friday seemed to be well received. People were interested in some of the applications and uses of the site and there was definite interest in the ID mapping data that I explained would be available in the future.

I described the site as a “Social Location Experimentation Platform”. I had come up with this term a few days previous, I think trying to channel some of the excitement that BERG find with their name (based on British Experimental Rocketry Group). Though I came up with it after the description I think my explanation was valid. I pointed out that the mapme.at platform allows experimentation not just by developers who can come up with some interesting and fun apps (like Adrian McEwen’s ferry trackers or my “Weasley” clock) but also by users who are able to experiment with mapme.at and with other location tracking applications like Foursquare and Google Latitude and can do it knowing that even if they only play with a service for a week and then stop using it, they won’t have wasted that week of data collection because mapme.at will do the job of storing up all their history in one place that they can access at any time and from any other compatible service.

If you’re interested in reading through my talk you can find the slides here.

As I spent most of yesterday travelling I now have a very short week this week (and hence this blog post being very late). I’m probably also going to the Hacks and Hackers event on Friday which will also restrict the time I have to spend on client work. Hopefully there’ll be less interruptions from kittens too (though this blog post has already been interrupted by them once!) On that note I better get started, see you next week!

Well, this past week was supposed to be devoted to a new client iPhone app. “Unfortunately” I didn’t get sign-off for it but that did mean I could keep going with my chess app. With various other bits and pieces to cover I’ve managed to spend about a day, maybe two on that in the last week. Last Monday I also ended up finishing off the wordpress blog project for Clear Digital and then taking a trip over to Manchester. I had an interesting meeting with a potential client who want to do a really big iPad project. They initially wanted me for 12 weeks full time which actually spooked me a bit as I don’t usually do full time. I’ve yet to hear what’s happening with that but could be an interesting project to work on if they do want me to go ahead with it. After that meeting I met up with Dave Verwer and went to NSManchester in the evening. While at NSManchester I gave a very hastily put together presentation on the iPhone app store positions app that I worked on the previous week. Talk seemed to go well and I had time to chat with some interesting people in the pub afterwards too.

I got home from Manchester at about 11:30 and began my planned server migration. My current server is hosted by Hetzner and is a “DS3000″, AMD Athlon 64 3700+ with 2GB memory and 2x160GB drive (probably, I bought mine over a year ago so specs may have changed). They now have an “EQ4″ which offers Intel i7-920 quadcore with 8GB memory and 2x750GB drive for exactly the same price, though with a setup fee. I’m currently hosting mapme.at on one of these and it’s running really well so I decided to upgrade my other server too. On the older server I’ve been using VMware to host most of my stuff in a virtual machine. The idea for this was that when it did come to moving servers in the future (i.e. now) I could do it by simply copying the VM across and starting it up. By about 3:30am on Tuesday morning after wrestling with VMware and networking for many hours I was getting pretty tired. I got a few hours sleep (as much as my cat would let me before she decided she needed feeding) and then tried again in the morning. After another few hours I decided that VMs were not the way to go :-/ Considering I host everything on ubuntu and that’s super easy to set up anyway the ease of setup isn’t really that big a deal, also having to copy massive virtual disk images wasn’t proving to be fun anyway. I’m going to host my services on the bare metal which means I can switch from one server to the other by doing a simple rsync to get up to date, re-syncing databases and then switching DNS. Unfortunately I haven’t yet had time to do this, ideally I’d do it overnight like I attempted last week but considering the app store positions app keeps filling up the disk and knocking out services I’m worrying less about the downtime, it should be minimal anyway now it’ll just take some resyncing.

I ended the week by attending the Liver & Mash event organised by Mandy Phillips. The event was in the spirit of previous “mashed libraries” events which have tried to introduce librarians to the concept of mashups and the many ways in which they can be useful. I wasn’t really sure what to expect from the event but had agreed to talk on “Maps” so prepared some slides and went along. In the end the event was really useful, it wasn’t really too dissimilar from other web/technology events I’ve been to. Everybody was really interested in mashups using various web APIs, hardware hacking with Arduino and other techologies, and pretty much anything that interests geeks. The libraries side of it gave it some focus but was easy to get to grips with for someone like me who has had minimal experience of libraries recently.

Most of the talks were given in three tracks and the rooms were assigned by order of popularity. As it happened my talk on maps was voted most popular and I was asked to give it in the main room to everybody! The talk seemed to be well received, looking at the twitter back channel, with most people finding the various examples I gave interesting. I only had 15 minutes so gave some basic background on maps in general and where my experience of online mapping started. I gave some examples of using mapping APIs and OpenStreetMap then finished off with a quick overview of mapme.at and my experiences of tracking my location. As usual slides can be found on slideshare (usual problems with videos, though these can be found on my user page on vimeo).

In the afternoon I also ran an hour and a half workshop on mapping. I’m not sure how well this went as we were in a fairly small room and I hadn’t particularly prepared any tasks for attendees to try out. I tried to go through some of the best ways to use mapping APIs (use mapstraction!) How to get involved with OpenStreetMap, how to edit the map using GPS, Aerial imagery or even the new Ordnance Survey data. I also covered the various ways to use OSM data including loading it into mapstraction or using the Cloudmade APIs to generate custom map styles and retrieve data through the web services. I got plenty of questions from my audience though and gave answers for all of them so hopefully they enjoyed it.

All-in-all I think the day went really well. Unfortunately when my talk finished at 3:30 I had to rush out straight away and didn’t get to enjoy the evening revelry. Instead I hopped into the car to rush to London for a leaving party!

Hm.. doing week 88 a day before I should be doing week 89. Oh well, I’ll try to make this a quick one just to get it out.

Last week was really busy with Where 2.0 and WhereCamp in San Francisco. The conferences went really well, met up with lots of old friends and made some really great new friendships. I got my talk finished and gave it to a good sized audience. The people I spoke to seemed to think it went well and especially liked the video of the clock (as usual) and the new visualisations I got ITO World to produce. I put a write-up of the talk over on the mapme.at blog.

All trips taken in the past 3 years from John McKerrell on Vimeo.

At WhereCamp I also got the opportunity to show my visualisations again, including the clock video and the graphs as well as the videos. This was during an “open mic” style session on geo-visualisation which was fun. Various people got up and showed what they’d been doing.

I could probably have done more to get push mapme.at and make connections while I was out there, unfortunately I didn’t get any meetings arranged or anything like that, but I still think the experience was valuable. Hopefully I’ll get to go next year, I’ve already thought of something I can show at the WhereFair!

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